TAPIF Spring Lesson Plans for Lycée and BTS

Hello TAPIF friends. I already did a list of the lesson plans and general job duties I used last semester for my lycée and tourism BTS classes, but here are the additional ones I’ve used this semester that, I would have to say after a bit of lesson-planning experience, are probably a bit better. While last semester the teachers pretty much asked me “present something on this topic,” this semester I was given a lot of room to do what I wanted with the classes with more general guidelines like “do something related to progress.” This semester, I also had the added odd job of transcribing a lot of audio material and making copies for teachers when they were busy.

Groundhog’s Day

I was mostly joking with myself when I came up with this lesson, but it has 100% been the most successful lesson I’ve had all year, and could be adapted for every level from seconde all the way up to BTS. First, I asked if anybody had heard of Groundhog’s Day, or knew what a groundhog was (giving the hint that some call it a marmot, which is the same as the French word). I then explained that it was an American holiday (make sure to explain that this word does not always refer to “les vacances“) celebrated every February 2nd in Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania with Punxsutawney Phil the Groundhog. At this point, I would usually review the vocabulary for the different seasons as well as the vocabulary for “changing of the seasons” and “to predict.” I would then draw the two different scenarios where the groundhog sees his shadow and hides underground for six more weeks of winter or leaves the ground for an early spring. Then, I would make sure the class understood everything by asking them who celebrated Groundhog’s Day, where it took place, and when it was celebrated. I would then review the conditional of if/then phrases (i.e. If Phil sees (present tense) his shadow, then there will be (future) six more weeks of winter). Then I’d have the class get into groups of two or three and invent their own holiday to predict the changing of the seasons using the conditional and answering the same who/where/when questions. If there was any time left, each group presented their holiday and we’d vote on the best one. The answers were incredible! (“If you shave your arm hair and it grows back in two weeks, then spring will come early,” “If Nugget the Chicken poops on a baby, there will be six more weeks of winter,” “If your love kisses you on February 14th, then spring is already there”).

Music Videos

This was a lesson I distinctly remember doing all the time back in my high school French classes. Basically, just make a worksheet based off of a music video including lyrics with missing words, a related grammar lesson, and discussion questions (my favorite way to have discussion, by the way, is to give them a few minutes in small groups to look over the discussion questions, prepare their thoughts and some vocabulary, and then come together as a class for the big discussion). I had a lot of success this semester with the music video for Declan McKenna’s “The Kids Don’t Wanna Come Home”, for which I made this packet.

The Women’s March/Women’s Rights in the USA

After Trump’s inauguration, there were, of course, the Women’s Marches‘s around the world (there was even one in Montpellier!), so I designed a lesson around the current event. First, I asked if they had heard about the Women’s March and explained why it happened. I then brought up a web article that listed the number of participants by each city for students to read and practice their numbers with. I absolutely cannot find the article anywhere online anymore: however, this article would work just as well, and has the plus of practicing dates.  I then brought up these three pictures each representing a different wave of feminism and had the students describe the picture to me and what they might think that wave fought for. I then passed out this timeline cut up/without the years/mixed up to groups of two or three and had them try to put them in order. To finish the class, I gave them the years for each event and asked if any of the dates surprised them and how it compared to France.

The Super Bowl

I started by, of course, explaining what the Super Bowl was. I then took a few statistics about the Super Bowl from here, and listed them scrambled on two different sides of the board so that there was a column of numbers and a column of nouns (i.e. gallons of beer, pounds of popcorn, cost of one ad, number of people watching) and had the students match the two, saying–of course–the full phrases when guessing. I then showed a few Super Bowl ads and had them answer questions like:
What is this ad selling?
Who is it for?
Is it effective?

American Stereotypes of French People

Okay, the plan for this one is super simple but worked so well. I literally just asked about a dozen of my American friends “what is your stereotype of French people?”, compiled their answers (luckily, I have one ridiculous friend who gave answers like “Every French person’s home will include a table laid out with charcuterie, wine and cheese,” “Each French person knows someone who makes French bread professionally,” “They make excellent little spoons,” “French people, who I have come to know intimately, love cigarettes as much as they detest our American superiority,” among others; he was very inspired by the prompt), brought them to class, and had each student read one statement. The conversations that came from this were enough to fill the hour. IF that hadn’t been the case, I was going to have the students write up a scene where one of them was an American by French Stereotypes and the other was a French Person by American Stereotypes, but we always ran out of time before we got to this.
P.S. bonus if the French think it’s disgusting that women would have hairy armpits and you are, consequently, a woman with hairy armpits.

Slam Poetry

As a personal bias, I think slam poetry is the best form of poetry. In terms of teaching English, though, it is a definite asset to teaching poetry because it includes listening comprehension, and a level of non-verbal communication that is always helping in teaching a foreign language. For my slam poetry lesson, I used Sarah Kay’s “The Type”, because she speaks a little more slowly than many slam poets (and also just because it is one of my faves). I followed this worksheet in teaching it.

BTS Tourism Specific

BTS, in my experience at least, has been the most difficult section I’ve had, and inspiring motivation can be difficult at times. However, I did try to make some tourism-specific lesson plans for them:

  1. I showed this documentary about Lake Powell in conjunction with this packet, and a follow up with the more touristy Arizona Highways TV spot on the same topic with this one. Going through both took a little under two hours.
  2. I made a presentation on Mardi Gras in New Orleans and we compared the traditions with those in Pézenas. We then divided the class in two and each group had to try and convince us which one was better.

 

 

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